How To Get Your Card in Oregon, USA. How To Get Your Card elsewhere in the USA, and around the World, also.

Welcome to MERCYs Guide to Medical Cannabis in the United States of America

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Information about CannaButter CannaButter - a cannabis-infused medicinal application
Information about Cannabis Tea Canna-Tea - Tea, a cannabis-infused medicinal application
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Information about Canasol Canasol - a cannabis-based medicine
Information about Rick Simpson Oil (RSO) - Rick Simpson Oil
Information about Golden, Honey Oil (GHO) - Golden, Honey Oil
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  USA Index   |   Resources in the USA   |
Welcome to MERCYs Home page and Index to Info on Medical Cannabis in the United States of America. 

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This is our overview of USA related Items.   Federal information as well as state-by-state.   Status, Law, Legislation, News, Action, Resources; Forums, Organizations, Businesses, - and - Information; Links, Librarys, Gallerys, Calendars - and more.

Information and other Resources by Federal and State

A map of of the country by state.

Washington Oregon California Idaho Montana Nevada Arizona Alaska Utah Hawaii Wyoming Colorado New Mexico North Dakota South Dakota Nebraska Kansas Oklahoma Texas Minnesota Iowa Missouri Arkansas Louisiana Wisconsin Illinois Michigan Michigan Indiana Kentucky Ohio Tennessee Mississippi Alabama Florida Georgia South Carolina North Carolina West Virginia Virginia District of Columbia Maryland Delaware New Jersey Connecticut Connecticut Pennsylvania New Jersey New York Vermont New Hampshire Vermont New Hampshire Maine Massachusetts Rhode Island Massachusetts Maryland Federal
Medical Cannabis in U.S.A.

Thanks to Americans For Safe Access (ASA) for the map, info and all the great things they do!

The use, sale and possession of cannabis (marijuana) in the United States is still illegal under federal law. However, some states have created exemptions for medical cannabis use, as well as decriminalized non-medical cannabis use. In four states, Alaska, Oregon, Colorado, and Washington, the sale and possession of marijuana is legal for both medical and non-medical use. Multiple efforts to reschedule cannabis under the Controlled Substances Act have failed, and the United States Supreme Court has ruled in United States v. Oakland Cannabis Buyers' Cooperative and Gonzales v. Raich that the federal government has a right to regulate and criminalize cannabis. Also, if the cannabis is called "medical cannabis" the federal law still has priority.

STATUS: Medical Cannabis (Marijuana) in America, United States of (USA), Yes and No ... | U.S. FEDERAL LAW: Illegal; Both Cannabis and Tetrahydrocannabinols, the active chemicals contained in Cannabis plants, are Schedule I in the United States. This means they are federally illegal to cultivate, buy, possess, or distribute (sell, trade or give) in all forms (cannabis plants, extracts, hash, hash oil, thc, etc) except synthetic THC (Marinol) which is Schedule III.

As a Schedule I drug under the federal Controlled Substances Act of 1970, marijuana (cannabis) is considered to have "no accepted medical use" and is illegal for any reason, with the exception of FDA-approved research programs. The Act allows mis-controlled substances to be reclassified by petition by any member of the public, but federal agencies have so far delayed for many years each such petition on behalf of cannabis, and then denied it. Yet, Four (4) living patients continue to receive federal marijuana, including, since 1983, Irvin Rosenfeld (for bone spurs), a 52-year-old stockbroker who has been featured in numerous print articles and on the Penn & Teller: Bullshit! cable television series; Elvy Musikka (for glaucoma); and George McMahon (who authored Prescription Pot, a book detailing the federal program, which contains the only existing medical study performed on legal patients).

The marijuana is grown on a farm at the University of Mississippi in Oxford and each person receives 300 doses a month. These patients are required by the U. S. Government to smoke the marijuana through a "rolled paper tube" (not ingesting or using pipes or vaporizers). Patients and their doctors report significant medical benefits from their use of marijuana.

U.S. STATE LAW(s): Laws and Enforcement varies from state to state - Legal in four (4) states and DC, thirty-plus states and DC have enacted laws that legalized medical cannabis (marijuana) in some form; Several have Hemp laws but only in Colorado is anyone planting any seeds.

Legally, there is a split between the U. S. federal and many state governments over medical marijuana policy. On June 6, 2005, the Supreme Court, in Gonzales v. Raich, ruled in a 6-3 decision that Congress has the right to outlaw medicinal cannabis, thus subjecting all patients to federal prosecution even in states where the treatment is legalized. The case brought into tension two themes of the Rehnquist court: the limits it has imposed on the federal government and the latitude it has afforded law enforcement officers. Joining Justice John Paul Stevens's majority decision were Justices Anthony Kennedy, David Souter, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, and Stephen Breyer. Justice Antonin Scalia wrote separately to say he agreed with the result, though not the majority's reasoning. Chief Justice William Rehnquist and Justices Sandra Day O'Connor and Clarence Thomas dissented. LEGAL for All: Currently, four (4) states - Alaska, Colorado Oregon, and Washington, plus the District of Columbia - have Legalized, making it Medical for Everybody. Also, in Michigan, several municipalities have passed laws favorable towards legalization. This does not legalize its use in the state just as state laws are over-ridden by federal.

MEDICAL: Forty-plus states have some form of medical marijuana laws in effect on the books. Some 16 States have Laws Specifically allowing Legal Cannabidiol (CBD): Alabama, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Iowa, Kentucky, Mississippi, Missouri, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, Wisconsin and Wyoming. In Missouri, they have a CBD-Only law and two municipalities have passed laws favorable towards medical marijuana. This does not legalize its use in the state just as state laws are over-ridden by federal. Georgia has a Law from the 80's, but it was never implemented.

Florida narrowly missed a constitutional amendment allowing Medical Cannabis, has an Affirmative Defense law and a CBD-Only law. Maryland has an Affirmative Defense law as well. Affirmative defenses, which protect from conviction but not arrest, are or may be available in several states even if the patient doesn't have an ID card: Rhode Island, Michigan, Colorado, Nevada, Oregon, and, in some circumstances, Delaware. Hawaii also has a separate 'choice of evils' defense. Patient ID cards are voluntary in Maine and California, but in California they offer the strongest legal protection. In Delaware, the defense is only available between when a patient submits a valid application and receives their ID card.

Also, Iowa and Oregon have re-scheduled marijuana from Schedule I. More on ReScheduling > here <<

In the United States, there are important legal differences between medical cannabis at the federal and state levels. At the federal level, cannabis per se has been made criminal by implementation of the Controlled Substances Act, but as of 2009, new federal guidelines have been enacted. According to U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder, "It will not be a priority to use federal resources to prosecute patients with serious illnesses or their caregivers who are complying with state laws on medical marijuana, but we will not tolerate drug traffickers who hide behind claims of compliance with state law to mask activities that are clearly illegal."

California passed an initiative to allow medical cannabis in 1996. In the intervening years, multiple states have passed similar initiatives. A January 2010 ABC News poll showed that 81 percent of Americans believed that medical cannabis should be legal in the United States. Most recently, in June 2014 New York became the 23rd state to legalize medical marijuana not including DC, however the marijuana cannot be smoked.

Twenty-five (25) states, plus the District of Columbia, have medical marijuana programs already or planned, some of which have Limited and Non-Smoking versions of medical cannabis (marijuana) laws: Alaska, Arizona, California, Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Illinois, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania Rhode Island Vermont and Washington.

SOURCE(s) = [0] - Medical cannabis in the United States | From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medical_cannabis_in_the_United_States / [1] - Cannabis in the United States | From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cannabis_in_the_United_States / [2] - Legal and medical status of cannabis | From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Legal_and_medical_status_of_cannabis / [3] - Legal Status of | Cannabis around the World - by Erowid http://www.erowid.org/plants/cannabis/cannabis_law.shtml / [4] - Legality of cannabis by country | From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Legality_of_cannabis_by_country

Federal Medical Marijuana Laws

Places that have decriminalized non-medical cannabis in the United States Places that have decriminalized non-medical cannabis in the United States - From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia | Multiple places have decriminalized non-medical cannabis in the United States; however, cannabis is illegal under federal law. Gonzales v. Raich (2005) held in a 6-3 decision that the Commerce Clause of the United States Constitution allowed the federal government to ban the use of cannabis, including medical use even if local laws allow it. Most places that have decriminalized cannabis have civil fines, drug education, or drug treatment in place of incarceration and/or criminal charges for possession of small amounts of cannabis, or have made various cannabis offenses the lowest priority for law enforcement. Contents: Map, List of States, References, External links ... Visit - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Places_that_have_decriminalized_non-medical_cannabis_in_the_United_States

The Law - U.S. Marijuana Laws, Medical Marijuana Facts, Cannabis, Hemp U.S. Marijuana Laws, Medical Marijuana Facts, Cannabis, Hemp | Provides U.S. Marijuana Laws, Facts About Marijuana, Marijuana Drug Testing, Drug Detection Times, Medical Marijuana, and Information About Your Rights ... North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon... visit - www.usmarijuanalaws.com

USA - Resource, info; Medical Cannabis Legal Information By State & Federal Law Legal Information By State & Federal Law | Federal and State Legal Information: Learn about state and federal medical marijuana laws, rulings, the Controlled Substance Act & the role of state enforcement.  Visit - www.safeaccessnow.org/state_and_federal_law

USA - Resource, info; Medical Cannabis - ProCon.org ProCon.org | 25 Legal Medical Marijuana States and DC Laws, Fees, and Possession Limits >>  Visit - medicalmarijuana.procon.org/view.resource.php?resourceID=000881

USA - Resource, info; Medical Cannabis - ProCon.org Medical Marijuana in USA | The following states have medical marijuana laws enacted. Modern research suggests that cannabis is a valuable aid in the treatment of a wide range of clinical applications. These include pain relief, nausea, spasticity, glaucoma, and movement disorders. Marijuana is also a powerful appetite stimulant and emerging research suggests that marijuana's medicinal properties may protect the body against some types of malignant tumors, and are neuroprotective. Select a state to get detailed information. >>  Visit - norml.org/legal/medical-marijuana-2

USA - Resource, info; Medical Cannabis Legal Information By State & Federal Law Local Advocacy Resources | Americans for Safe Access takes great pride in the strength of our grassroots organizers and local activists who work tirelessly to ensure medical cannabis patients can have safe and affordable access to their medicine. Find official ASA Chapter, Action Groups, and Affiliates in your area as well as take action online and learn about your state laws.  Visit - www.safeaccessnow.org/local_resources

USA - Resource, info; Medical Cannabis New South Wales Government (NSW-AU) Health > Druginfo > Medical Cannabis >> USA | Federal: Legislation, Court Decisions and Commentaries, States: Legislation and Programs State: Legislation and Programs, Active State medicinal marijuana laws >>  Visit - http://www.druginfo.nsw.gov.au/medicinal_use_of_cannabis/medicinal_cannabis_usa



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Information about Medical Cannabis in the United States of America MERCY in America; Medical Cannabis in the USA; Information and other Resources by Status


States with Medical Cannabis Law

  Information about Medical Cannabis in Alaska Alaska
  Information about Medical Cannabis in Arizona Arizona
  Information about Medical Cannabis in California California
  Information about Medical Cannabis in Colorado Colorado
  Information about Medical Cannabis in Connecticut Connecticut
  Information about Medical Cannabis in Delaware Delaware
  Information about Medical Cannabis in Washington DC, District of Columbia (Washington) DC (District of Columbia)
  Information about Medical Cannabis in Hawaii Hawaii
  Information about Medical Cannabis in Illinois Illinois
  Information about Medical Cannabis in Maine Maine
  Information about Medical Cannabis in Massachusetts Massachusetts
  Information about Medical Cannabis in Michigan Michigan
  Information about Medical Cannabis in Montana Montana
  Information about Medical Cannabis in Nevada Nevada
  Information about Medical Cannabis in New Hampshire New Hampshire
  Information about Medical Cannabis in New Jersey New Jersey
  Information about Medical Cannabis in New Mexico New Mexico
  Information about Medical Cannabis in Oregon Oregon
  Information about Medical Cannabis in Pennsylvania Pennsylvania
  Information about Medical Cannabis in Rhode Island Rhode Island
  Information about Medical Cannabis in Vermont Vermont
  Information about Medical Cannabis in Washington State Washington State


States with In-active, In-effective -or- Partial Medical Cannabis Law

  Information about Medical Cannabis in Alabama Alabama
  Information about Medical Cannabis in Florida Florida
  Information about Medical Cannabis in Georgia Georgia
  Information about Medical Cannabis in Iowa Iowa
  Information about Medical Cannabis in Kentucky Kentucky
  Information about Medical Cannabis in Maryland Maryland
  Information about Medical Cannabis in Minnesota Minnesota
  Information about Medical Cannabis in Mississippi Mississippi
  Information about Medical Cannabis in Missouri Missouri
  Information about Medical Cannabis in New York New York
  Information about Medical Cannabis in North Carolina North Carolina
  Information about Medical Cannabis in Oklahoma Oklahoma
  Information about Medical Cannabis in South Carolina South Carolina
  Information about Medical Cannabis in Tennessee Tennessee
  Information about Medical Cannabis in Texas Texas
  Information about Medical Cannabis in Utah Utah
  Information about Medical Cannabis in Virginia Virginia
  Information about Medical Cannabis in Wisconsin Wisconsin


States without Medical Cannabis Law

  Information about Medical Cannabis in Arkansas Arkansas
  Information about Medical Cannabis in Idaho Idaho
  Information about Medical Cannabis in Indiana Indiana
  Information about Medical Cannabis in Kansas Kansas
  Information about Medical Cannabis in Louisiana Louisiana
  Information about Medical Cannabis in Nebraska Nebraska
  Information about Medical Cannabis in North Dakota North Dakota
  Information about Medical Cannabis in Ohio Ohio
  Information about Medical Cannabis in South Dakota South Dakota
  Information about Medical Cannabis in West Virginia West Virginia
  Information about Medical Cannabis in Wyoming Wyoming


State Medical Marijuana Laws

These states have medical marijuana laws enacted. Modern research suggests that cannabis is a valuable aid in the treatment of a wide range of clinical applications. These include pain relief, nausea, spasticity, glaucoma, and movement disorders. Marijuana is also a powerful appetite stimulant and emerging research suggests that marijuana's medicinal properties may protect the body against some types of malignant tumors, and are neuroprotective. Select a state to get detailed information. >> norml.org/legal/medical-marijuana-2

I. Twenty-plus states and DC have enacted laws that legalized medical marijuana, and four (4) of those states have Legalized, making it Medical for Everybody:

State Year Passed How Passed
(Yes Vote)
Fee Possession Limit Accepts other states' registry ID cards?
1. Alaska, * (Legal state) 1998 Ballot Measure 8 (58%) $25/$20 1 oz usable; 6 plants (3 mature, 3 immature) unknown1
2014 Ballot Measure 2 (52%) None 1 oz; 6 plants Yes, Adults only
2. Arizona 2010 Proposition 203 (50.13%) $150 / $752 2.5 oz usable; 0-12 plants3 Yes4
3. California 1996 Proposition 215 (56%) $66/$33 8 oz usable; 18 plants (6 mature, 12 immature) 5 No
4. Colorado, * (Legal state) 2000 Ballot Amendment 20 (54%) $35 2 oz usable; 6 plants (3 mature, 3 immature) No
2012 Ballot Amendment 64 (55%) None 1 oz; 6 plants (3 mature, 3 immature) Yes, Adults only
5. Connecticut 2012 Legislative action (HB 5389); Approved: By House 96-51, by Senate 21-13 $100, Learn More >> One-month supply (exact amount to be determined) Learn More >> No
6. DC, * (Legal status) 2010 Amendment Act B18-622 (13-0 vote) $100/$25 2 oz dried; limits on other forms to be determined No
2014 Initiative 71 (69%) None 2 oz, six (6) plants Yes, Adults only
7. Delaware 2011 Senate Bill 17 (27-14 House, 17-4 Senate) $125 6 oz usable Yes5
8. Hawaii 2000 Senate Bill 862 (32-18 House; 13-12 Senate) $25 3 oz usable; 7 plants (3 mature, 4 immature) No
9. Illinois 2013 House Bill 1 (61-57 House; 35-21 Senate) TBD 2.5 ounces of usable cannabis during a period of 14 days No 6
10. Maine 1999 Ballot Question 2 (61%) No fee 2.5 oz usable; 6 plants Yes6
11. Massachusetts 2012 Question 3 (61%); $50, Learn More >> Sixty day supply for personal medical use, Learn More >> unknown
12. Michigan 2008 Proposal 1 (63%) $100/$25 2.5 oz usable; 12 plants Yes
13. Minnesota 2014 Senate Bill 2470 (46-16 Senate; 89-40 House) $200/$50 30-day supply of non-smokable marijuana No1
14. Montana 2004 Initiative 148 (62%) $25/$10 1 oz usable; 4 plants (mature); 12 seedlings No
15. Nevada 2000 Ballot Question 9 (65%) $200 * 1 oz usable; 7 plants (3 mature, 4 immature) Yes *
16. New Hampshire 2013 House Bill 573 (284-66 House; 18-6 Senate) TBD * Two ounces of usable cannabis during a 10-day period Yes *
17. New Jersey 2010 Senate Bill 119 (48-14 House; 25-13 Senate) $200/$20 ** 2 oz usable No
18. New Mexico 2007 Senate Bill 523 (36-31 House; 32-3 Senate) $0 6 oz usable; 16 plants (4 mature, 12 immature) No
19. New York 2014 Assembly Bill 6357 (117-13 Assembly; 49-10 Senate) $50 30-day supply non-smokable marijuana No
20. Ohio 2016 House Bill 523 (71-26 H; 18-15 S) TBD Maximum of a 90-day supply, amount to be determined Yes
21. Oregon, * (Legal state) 1998 Ballot Measure 67 (55%) $200/$100 * 24 oz usable; 24 plants (6 mature, 18 immature) No
2014 Ballot Measure 91 (56%) None 8 oz usable; 4 plants Yes, Adults only
22. Pennsylvania 2016 Senate Bill 3 (149-46 H; 42-7 S) $50 30-day supply; No Home Grow Yes
23. Rhode Island 2006 Senate Bill 0710 (52-10 House; 33-1 Senate) $75/$10 2.5 oz usable; 12 plants Yes
24. Vermont 2004 Senate Bill 76 (22-7) HB 645 (82-59) $50 2 oz usable; 9 plants (2 mature, 7 immature) No
25. Washington, * (Legal state) 1998 Initiative 692 (59%) *** 24 oz usable; 15 plants No
2014 Initiative 502 (56%) None 1 oz -and / or- up to 16 oz of marijuana-infused product in solid form, -and/or- 72 oz in liquid form > more >> Yes, Adults only

NOTEs:

    Residency Requirement - Most states require proof of residency to be considered a qualifying patient for medical marijuana use. Only Oregon has announced that it will accept out-of-state applications. The Illinois law does not appear to have a residency requirement, but it is unknown whether the program rules will address this matter.

    Home Cultivation - Karen O'Keefe, JD, Director of State Policies for Marijuana Policy Project (MPP), told ProCon.org in a August 5, 2013 email that "Some or all patients and/or their caregivers can cultivate in 15 of the 20 states. Home cultivation is not allowed in Connecticut, Delaware, Illinois, New Hampshire, New Jersey, or the District of Columbia and a special license is required in New Mexico. In Arizona, patients can only cultivate if they lived 25 miles or more from a dispensary when they applied for their card. In Massachusetts, patients can only cultivate if they have a hardship waiver. In Nevada, patients can cultivate if they live more than 25 miles from a dispensary, if they are not able to reasonably travel to a dispensary, or if no dispensaries in the patients' counties are able to supply the strains they need. In addition, Nevada patients who were growing by July 1, 2013 may continue grow until March 31, 2016."

    Patient Registration - Karen O'Keefe stated the following in an Aug. 5, 2013 email to ProCon.org:

      "Affirmative defenses, which protect from conviction but not arrest, are or may be available in several states even if the patient doesn't have an ID card: Rhode Island, Michigan, Colorado, Nevada, Oregon, and, in some circumstances, Delaware. Hawaii also has a separate 'choice of evils' defense. Patient ID cards are voluntary in Maine and California, but in California they offer the strongest legal protection. In Delaware, the defense is only available between when a patient submits a valid application and receives their ID card.

      The states with no protection unless you're registered are: Alaska (except for that even non-medical use is protected in one's home due to the state constitutional right to privacy), Arizona, Connecticut, Montana, New Hampshire, Vermont, New Mexico, and New Jersey. Washington, D.C. also requires registration."

    Several states with legal medical marijuana have received letters from their respective United States Attorney's offices explaining that marijuana is a Schedule I substance and that the federal government considers growing, distribution, or possession of marijuana to be a federal crime regardless of the state laws. These letters have caused some states to delay or alter implementation of their medical marijuana programs.

    Between Mar. 27, 1979 and July 23, 1991, five US states enacted laws that legalized medical marijuana with a physician's prescription, however, those laws are considered symbolic because federal law prohibits physicians from "prescribing" marijuana, a schedule I drug.

    The five states were Virginia (25 KB) (Mar. 27, 1979), New Hampshire (Apr. 23, 1981), Connecticut (July 1, 1981), Wisconsin (Apr. 20, 1988), and Louisiana (July 23, 1991).

II. Some states have passed laws that, although favorable towards medical marijuana, do not allow for its use:

Delaware Oklahoma Texas

State

Year Passed

Provision(s)

QUALIFYING CONDITIONS:

PATIENT POSSESSION LIMITS:

HOME CULTIVATION:

STATE-LICENSED DISPENARIES:

CAREGIVERS:

RECIPROCITY:

1. Alabama

2014

CBD-Only law

Debilitating epileptic conditions

Possession of CBD by persons who are acting outside of state-sponsored clinical trials is not permitted under the law.

No

No

No

No

2. Florida

2014

CBD-Only law -and- Affirmative Defense; Allows medical use defense in court

Cancer, Muscle spasms, Seizures

State-qualified patients may possess cannabis strains containing ten percent or more of CBD and no more than eight-tenths of one percent of THC.

No

Yes, up to five facilities to dispense high-CBD strains to state-qualified patients.

No

No

3. Georgia

1981

Has a Law from the 80's, but it was never implemented.

TBA

TBA

TBA

TBA

TBA

TBA

4. Iowa

2014

CBD-Only law

Intractable epilepsy

Limited amounts of cannabidiol oil

No

No

No

No

5. Kentucky

2014

CBD-Only law

Intractable epilepsy

Possession of CBD by persons who are acting outside of a state-sponsored clinical protocol is not permitted under the law.

No

No

No

No

6. Mississippi

2014

CBD-Only law

Intractable epilepsy

Cannabis extracts that contain more than 15 percent cannabidiol and no more than 0.5 percent THC

No

No

No

No

7. Missouri

2014

CBD-Only law, state-wide; Municipal level Laws.

Intractable epilepsy

Twenty ounces of cannabis extracts containing five percent or more of CBD and no more than three-tenths of one percent of THC

No

Yes, Not yet OPERATIONAL

No

No

8. North Carolina

2014

CBD-Only law

Intractable epilepsy

Cannabis extracts containing more than 10 percent CBD and no more than 0.3 percent THC

No

No

No

No

9. South Carolina

2014

CBD-Only law

Dravet Syndrome Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome Refractory epilepsy

Cannabis extracts that contain more than 15 percent cannabidiol and no more than nine-tenths of one percent or less THC

No

No

No

No

10. Tennessee

2014

CBD-Only law

Intractable seizures

Cannabis oil containing no more than nine-tenths of one percent or less THC

No

No

No

No

11. Utah

2014

CBD-Only law

Intractable epilepsy

Cannabis extracts that contain more than 15 percent CBD and no more than 0.3 percent THC

No

Yes, Not yet OPERATIONAL

No

No

11. Utah

2014

CBD-Only law

Intractable epilepsy

Cannabis extracts that contain more than 15 percent CBD and no more than 0.3 percent THC

No

Yes, Not yet OPERATIONAL

No

No

15. Virginia

2015

CBD-Only law

Intractable epilepsy

Possession of marijuana extracts that contain at least 15% of either cannabidiol (CBD) or THC-A and no more than 5% THC.

No

Yes, Not yet OPERATIONAL

No

No

16. Wisconsin

2014

CBD-Only law

Seizure disorders

Possession of cannabidiol in a form without a psychoactive effect

No

No

No

No

III. Some states have municipalities and such that have passed laws favorable towards medical marijuana. This does not legalize its use in the state just as state laws are over-ridden by federal:

State, City

Year Passed

Provision/s

1. Missouri; Columbia, Cliff Village

2004

Visit - /links/Missouri.html - for more Detail.

2. Michigan; Ann Arbor, Detroit, Ferndale, Flint, and Traverse City

2004 - 2007

Now has state law, so city laws moot. Visit - http://norml.org/index.cfm?Group_ID=7198


Source:  www.ProCon.org

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