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PLEASE Help Allow Medical Cannabis for PTS(d) for Veterans, Police, Firefighters and Other American Citizens

Welcome to MERCYs web pages dedicated to information on Phoning Your Legislator Action for the Campaign to Add PTS(d) to the OMMP and related items of interest. 

SUMMARY:

- The Bill (S.B. 281) has passed the House (36-23) and will proceeed to the Gov for signing. There's a flyer the issue - here

DETAILs: Please give us Feedback -

    Tell Everybody You Know about The Pending Change and Get Them To Conx The Senators and Reps who Voted For Veterans and Say THANK YOU!

    Also, in Letters-to-the-Editor (LTEs), see the Contact info, below, and more - sample letters, plus.

    - Tell everybody you know. Print Off and Make copies of this document and pass around all over the place.

    - If you're not able to contact your Reps yourself, PLEASE feel free to contact us and we'll help get your testimony or talking points down and to them. Call 503.363-4588 (in the Salem area) or visit our Office

  About this page ...


JOIN the CAMPAIGN! Medical Cannabis for PTS(d) for Veterans, Police, Firefighters and Other American Citizens STATUS: - The Bill (S.B. 281) has passed the House (36-23) and will proceeed to the Gov for signing. PLEASE don't send the governor or anyone else a bunch of stuff with marijuana leaves plastered all over the place. They hate that and it is counterproductive. Most legislators look at that stuff and cringe. Many of them although supportive don't want anything to do with pot leaves, pictures or videos of people firin' up the ol' bong! Let's just keep working, keep our heads down and after we get passed what we want then you can celebrate. There will be a celebration after session for what we get accomplished but until then we need to work quietly along and get the job done.

A number of individuals and groups continued the Campaign after the previous effort and a Bill is now almost a reality. If your Representatives and Senators voted Yes on the PTSD bill, contact them and say Thanx! Don't worry about those that did not support the bill at this point as we may need some of them on the rest of our bills and don't want to alienate anyone. By Taking good notes and establishing lines of communication at this time, We can line them up for things like Sunsetting the Fee Hike.

Find Your Legislator Find Your Legislator online at -www.leg.state.or.us/findlegsltr/findset.htm. Visit: www.leg.state.or.us/findlegsltr/home.htm - and fill out the form entering your home address. Then click on the "submit" button and you will then be given your state and US legislators.

Write your legislator online Write your legislator online. To send a message to your State Senator or State Representative please visit: www.leg.state.or.us/writelegsltr/ and fill out the form. By entering your information, you will be automatically matched to either your State Senator or your State Representative. Click "submit" when you are ready to send your message.

Phoning Your Legislator Phoning Your Legislator. During a legislative session, you may call your legislators by contacting the WATS operator. Within Salem, call 503-986-1187. Outside of Salem, please call 1-800-332-2313.

Other Action Items

In the meantime, we must inform, educate and activate those who chose to use cannabis for PTS(d) (or PTSD) as to their Affirmative and Medical Necessity Defenses available to them in court, should that be necessary. Also, we'll want to maximize utilization and involvement of benefits, services and organizations in supporting the Veterans and other focus groups in general to help these folks.

  Action! What to do for this Alert 

Tell everybody you know Tell everybody you know. Click here for > Flyer with info front and back (2 pages, 8.5x11). Here for > PDF version. <, here for > Quarter sheet front < (or PDF version).

  Organizers Contact Info 

For Campaign Info in general, contact:

Perry Stripling
Campaign Librarian and Webster for
MERCY - the Medical Cannabis Resource Center
1745 Capital St. NE
Salem, OR, 97301
send email

  Officials to Contact Info 

Find Your Legislator Find Your Legislator online at - www.leg.state.or.us/findlegsltr/home.htm - and fill out the form entering your home address. Then click on the "submit" button and you will then be given your state and US legislators.

Write your legislator online Write your legislator online. To send a message to your State Senator or State Representative please visit: www.leg.state.or.us/writelegsltr/ and fill out the form. By entering your information, you will be automatically matched to either your State Senator or your State Representative. Click "submit" when you are ready to send your message.

Phoning Your Legislator Phoning Your Legislator. During a legislative session, you may call your legislators by contacting the WATS operator. Within Salem, call 503-986-1187. Outside of Salem, please call 1-800-332-2313.

  Act Now! 

Action Items

JOIN the CAMPAIGN! Medical Cannabis for PTS(d) for Veterans, Police, Firefighters and Other American Citizens Call your Representatives and Senators and get them to sign on as co-sponsors to the PTSD bill (S.B. 281). It does not matter if they are D's or R's. We need all the votes and co-sponsors we can get. Then get back to us with names so we can get the bill to them for them to sign on as co-sponsors. Don't confuse them with anything else. Concentrate on getting them to sign on to PTSD.

This bill will mean that thousands of Oregonians who use cannabis to combat mood symptoms, diseases or the intolerable effects of pharmaceuticals, will be free of danger of arrest, prosecution, civil asset forfeiture, child protective service investigations, employment discrimination, medical discrimination, jail and forced drug treatment. PLEASE contact us and Join the Campaign today! It is urgent that patients speak up, take part and tell Oregon and the World that you use cannabis to safely and effectively treat your conditions, or know someone who does, and that all patients deserve to use any medication that benefits them free of fear of prosecution.

Then, tell everybody you know. And, then, tell everybody you don't know. Yet.


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  Info on Action Alert 

TALKING POINTS: What is PTS(d)? How does Cannabis help?

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTS(d)) is a psychiatric illness that can occur following a traumatic event in which there was threat of injury or death to you or someone else. Post-traumatic stress disorder can develop after someone experiences or witnesses an event that causes intense fear, helplessness or horror. (PTS(d)) may occur soon after a major trauma, or can be delayed for more than six months after the event. When it occurs soon after the trauma it usually resolves after three months, but some people experience a longer-term form of the condition, which can last for many years. PTS(d) can occur at any age and can follow a natural disaster such as flood or fire, or events such as war or imprisonment, assault, domestic abuse, or rape.

Many people who are involved in traumatic events have a brief period of difficulty adjusting and coping, after which they improve and get better. In some cases, though, the symptoms can get worse or last for months or years. Symptoms can sometimes interfere with normal functioning, sleeping, and interpersonal relationships. This is often when the diagnosis of PTSD is made.


“One often intractable problem for which cannabis provides relief is post-traumatic stress disorder (PTS(d)). I have more than 100 patients with PTS(d). Among those reporting that cannabis alleviates their PTS(d) symptoms are veterans of the war in Vietnam, the first Gulf War, and the current occupation of Iraq. Similar benefit is reported by victims of family violence, rape and other traumatic events, and children raised in dysfunctional families.” -- David Bearman, MD; from PTS(d) and Cannabis: A Clinician Ponders Mechanism of Action.


Conventional treatment for PTSD includes psychotherapy, learning coping skills, and family counseling. Medications such as anti-depressants, mood stabilizers, sleep aids, and anti-anxiety medicines are often prescribed. Individual psychotherapy, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing, and Group Therapy are among the non-medical treatments that have been tried with limited success. Anti-depressants, sedatives, and anti-psychotic medications have also been employed with limited benefit and serious side effects. Currently the U.S. FDA has approved two anti-depressants for the treatment of PTSD.

These are Zoloft and Paxil, both of which have limited efficacy and produce remission in only about one-quarter of patients. Such medications have also been found to double the risk of suicidal thinking and suicidal attempts in patients 24 years or less, which pertains to a large percentage of our returning young veterans. Clearly, safer and more effective treatments are needed. PTSD not only results in an array of debilitating symptoms, but it also causes specific changes to certain areas of the brain that are responsible for the processing malfunctions that underlie this disease.

For now, PTSD patients that live in states where medical use of cannabis is approved are using it to help decrease the debilitating symptoms of their illness and improve their quality of life. If you or a loved one is suffering from PTSD, you may find relief from the use of medical marijuana. New Mexico, California and Delaware already allow PTSD patients to utilize Medical Cannabis, and it is likely that others will also follow suit as more states recognize the benefit that this herbal botanical substance can bring. But nothing is going to happen unless we make it. Those of us who recognize the benefit of using Cannabis to treat PTSD need to make our voices heard in the Oregon Legislature.

  PTS(d) and Cannabis 

Many PTSD sufferers have found good results with medical cannabis use, especially for relief of insomnia and anxiety. Cannabis can give PTSD patients a sense of well being and serenity, and it allows them to continue to function with little to no adverse side effects. PTSD patients often prefer medical cannabis over conventional medications, as it is a single medication that helps with a number of symptoms (as opposed to taking multiple medications for each separate symptom) , and the risk of medication interactions is removed. There are a number of researchers currently exploring the science behind the use of cannabis for treatment of PTSD and the results are promising.

A study from Israel in 2009 found that the cannabinoids (the medicinal compounds in the cannabis plant) prevented a stress response in previously traumatized rats. Another report from Israel in 2011 that PTSD patients using medical cannabis had "significant improvement in quality of life and pain, with some positive changes in severity of PTSD". These researchers, as part of their routine consulting work at MaReNA Diagnostic and Consulting Center in Bat-Yam, Israel, assessed the mental condition of 79 adult PTSD patients who had applied to the Ministry of Health in order to obtain a medical cannabis license. About half of the patients got their licenses and were studied for about two years.

The majority of these patients also used conventional medications. The daily dosage of cannabis was about 2-3 grams per day. The patients reported a discontinuation of or lowering of dosages of pain killers and sedatives. The group of patients that showed improvement were those that also suffered from pain and/or depression. Researchers concluded that "results show good tolerability and other benefits, particularly in the patients with either pain and/or depression comorbidity". (Comorbity is the term used when a patient suffers from more than one condition). These results were presented at the 2011 Cannabinoid Conference in Bonn, Germany.

Many of our patients who suffer from PTSD report that medical marijuana has helped them by lessening anxiety, improving mood, improving sleep, eliminating nightmares and producing an overall improved sense of well-being. Many of these patients had tried and failed other medication treatments.

Why? How Does Medical Cannabis Work for PTSD?

Activation of the primitive mammalian brain, or limbic system, during times of severe stress may play a role in optimizing survival. However, when this center of the brain becomes hyper-active and over-stimulated as a result of misguided neuro-plasticity, direct intervention at the cellular level is required. The key to using Cannabis to treat PTSD lies in the distribution of naturally occurring Cannabinoid receptors in those areas of the brain that cause the symptoms associated with PTSD.

The presence of CB1 receptors in the hippocampus, amygdala, prefrontal cortex and anterior cingulate cortex supports the conclusion that Cannabinoids are involved in regulating anxiety, response to stressful situations, and the extinction of conditioned fear. This conclusion is also supported by pre-clinical research showing that mice without CB1 receptors, or mice whose CB1 receptors have been rendered non-functional by chemical blockade, exhibit increased levels of anxious behavior and loss of the ability to extinguish previously learned fearful behaviors.

Conversely, the stimulation of CB1 receptors in the amygdala of rats has been shown to protect against the effects of stress on fear conditioning and avoidance behavior. Early human studies using synthetic Cannabinoids have also shown that stimulation of the endogenous Cannabinoid system is significantly effective in reducing the occurrence of treatment-resistant nightmares in PTSD patients, along with subjective improvements in sleep time and sleep quality, and a reduction in daytime flashbacks.

These results stand in stark contrast to a recent study sponsored by the Veterans Administration National Center for PTSD, which showed that treatment with a second-generation anti-psychotic medication was ineffective at controlling symptoms in combat related PTSD patients.

For more information, Visit our page of info on PTS(d) and Cannabis, and tell everybody you know about it. And get them to write and spread the word, etc.

  Library of Documentation for this Alert  

Title / Description

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STATE OF MICHIGAN DEPARTMENT OF LICENSING AND REGULATORY AFFAIRS BUREAU OF HEALTH CARE SERVICES MICHIGAN MEDICAL MARIHUANA REVIEW PANEL | It is with great importance that Four Freedoms submits the enclosed three packets of evidentiary documentation in response to the decision of the Michigan Medical Marijuana Review Panel to deny PTSd as a qualifying condition to the Michigan Medical Marijuana Act of 2008. ( Packet, part 1 of 3 --- 13 research papers supporting the use of cannabis to treat symptoms of PTSd. )

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here

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STATE OF MICHIGAN DEPARTMENT OF LICENSING AND REGULATORY AFFAIRS BUREAU OF HEALTH CARE SERVICES MICHIGAN MEDICAL MARIHUANA REVIEW PANEL | It is with great importance that Four Freedoms submits the enclosed three packets of evidentiary documentation in response to the decision of the Michigan Medical Marijuana Review Panel to deny PTSd as a qualifying condition to the Michigan Medical Marijuana Act of 2008. ( Packet, part 2 of 3 --- 7 research papers supporting the use of cannabis as harm reduction. )

- n/a -

here

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STATE OF MICHIGAN DEPARTMENT OF LICENSING AND REGULATORY AFFAIRS BUREAU OF HEALTH CARE SERVICES MICHIGAN MEDICAL MARIHUANA REVIEW PANEL | It is with great importance that Four Freedoms submits the enclosed three packets of evidentiary documentation in response to the decision of the Michigan Medical Marijuana Review Panel to deny PTSd as a qualifying condition to the Michigan Medical Marijuana Act of 2008. ( Packet, part 3 of 3 --- New Mexico Medical Cannabis Program Advisory Board final report 7 Nov 2012, media reports relevant to issue from New Mexico, and additional antidotal evidence. )

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here

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EDWARD GLICK’S PETITION PURSUANT TO ORS §475.334 | In the Matter of the Petition of Edward Glick, to add Clinical Depression, Depressive Symptoms, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTS(d)), Severe Anxiety, Agitation and Insomnia, to Those Diseases and Conditions Which Qualify as ‘Debilitating Medical Conditions’ under the Oregon Medical Marijuana Act

here

here

here for DOC and here for WPS

New Research. | Petitioner Edward Glick, petitions the Oregon Medical Marijuana Program to add Clinical Depression, Depressive Symptoms, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTS(d)), Severe Anxiety, Agitation and Insomnia to Those Diseases and Conditions Which Qualify as ‘Debilitating Medical Conditions’ under the Oregon Medical Marijuana Act, as follows: This petition is subject to OAR 333-008-0090, and for that reason, petitioner submits the following new scientific research in support of adding each of these conditions. This additional research submission is in addition to research submitted in January, 2009.

here

here

here

Detailed Explanation, final. | Detailed Explanation Justifying the Inclusion of Additional Conditions Detailed Explanation Justifying Inclusion of “Psychiatric” Conditions onto the List of “Qualifying Conditions” in the Oregon Medical Marijuana Program A Petition to the Oregon Department of Human Services was submitted through the Advisory Committee on Medical Marijuana on January 26, 2009. The objective of this Petition is to request the Oregon DHS to conduct an expert advisory panel. This process which is described in ORS 475.334 previously met in 2000. The end result of that deliberation was the inclusion of “Agitation Related to Alzheimers Disease” to the list of qualifying conditions of the Oregon Medical Marijuana Act. On February 9, 2009, DHS accepted the recent petition and requested “a detailed explanation for why these conditions should be included…” This document attempts to supply that explanation.

here

here

here

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INSTRUCTIONS Enter the NotePad! Enter questions, comments and link info in the NotePad, NOTE - we do NOT automatically capture e-mail address - you must enter it.   EDITing is up to you, what you submit is what gets posted.   If you leave info for the above section here, It will be transfered up to the main list as soon as we can.   To request further maintenance -or- for more private communications, use the FeedBack form below.
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  Comments  

Friday, May 31 at 08:32 AM:
Anthony from National Cannabis Coalition (NCC) wrote:
" Oregon Legislature Votes to Allow PTSD Sufferers Medical Cannabis by Anthony Johnson • May 30, 2013 • Blog Our military veterans, and anyone who has suffered through a horribly traumatic event, deserve safe access to cannabis, a nontoxic medicine that can help alleviate symptoms of PTSD. Fittingly, the Oregon Legislature voted to add Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) as a qualifying condition under the Oregon Medical Marijuana Act (OMMA) just a few days after Memorial Day. While any patient diagnosed with PTSD may get qualified under the state’s medical law, the plight of veterans dominated hearings and discussions surrounding the bill. Now, onto Governor Kitzhaber’s desk. The Oregon House just passed Senate Bill 281 36-21, following a 19-11 vote in the Senate. While Democrats overwhelmingly supported the bill, the effort was bipartisan as Republican Senator Brian Boquist sponsored this important bill in the first place. On the Senate side, 6 Republicans joined 13 Democrats. On the House side, 6 Republicans voted “AYE” along with 29 Democrats. Compassionate Oregon put together a tremendous lobbying effort and should be commended for its great work this legislative session. " > ead more >>

Wednesday, April 17, 2013 at 07:04 AM:
a from OR wrote:
"I'm watching the video on OPB... it's on shelter dogs being trained for service dogs, the second 1/2 hour focusing on vets w/ PTSD. - halopets.com/shelterme/ - I highly recommend it. As part of our actions I'm so proud that so many choose to stand for and with all of us veterans. In listening to the 2 vets featured it only serves to reinforce how simple some needs are to be met.

If dogs can be service animals, why can't cannabis be the equivalent gentle, dependable, humane and compassionate service plant? When one of the young men talked about nightmares my first thought was a couple of gentle dose sweetleaf butter cookies. The love of pets and the satisfaction of a garden are powerful healing tools. And lord knows this nation has some healing to do.

If you watch Shelter Me keep the kleenex handy

a"

Saturday, April 6, 2013 at 05:53 PM:
i wrote:
"Great idea, Cheryl.

I signed it, and included this in the comments - which I think is the loud and clear message the legislature needs to hear (even more than the scientific reasons for why PTSD should be added - I don't think THIS can be said often enough):

"The last thing a veteran with PTSD needs is an arrest or a drug raid on their home. Please grant those with PTSD the same protections from arrest and prosecution for their medical use of marijuana that over 55,000 other Oregonians have under the OMMP. Marijuana helps them and it should not be criminal for them to use it. They protected us, now it is our turn to protect them."

I also shared it to facebook.

Jennifer

-----Original Message-----
From: owner- dpfor@drugsense.org [mailto:owner- dpfor@drugsense.org] On Behalf Of execdir@compassioncenter.net
Sent: Thursday, January 31, 2013 8:53 AM
To: dpfor@drugsense.org
Subject: DPFOR: Petition to add PTSD to OMMA

Hi,

Our veterans and other victims of trauma are dealing with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) on a daily basis. Despite studies showing the effectiveness of medical marijuana in controlling traumatic memories, it is not a qualifying condition under the Oregon Medical Marijuana Act (OMMA). Senate Bill 281 would change this and we need to support its passage.

That's why I created a petition to The Oregon State House and The Oregon State Senate, which says:

"Please support SB 281, which will allow our veterans and others suffering from PTSD to qualify for medical marijuana under the OMMA."

Will you sign my petition? Click here to add your name: http://signon.org/sign/support-senate-bill-281?source=c.fwd&r_by=6935034

Thanks!

Cheryl Smith
Compassion Center "

Tuesday, March 19, 2013 at 10:14 AM:
i wrote:
" Medical Marijuana For PTSD? Compelling Testimony In Oregon - by Keith Mansur | The Oregon Senate Health and Human Services committee on February 7 heard testimony on SB 281. The bill, according to its own summary, “Adds post- traumatic stress disorder to definition of ‘debilitating medical conditions’ for purposes of statutes authorizing medical use of marijuana.” If the testimony at the hearing is any indication, it seems to have a reasonable chance!

Held in Hearing Room A of the State Capitol building, more than 25 people testified at the hearing. The committee is chaired by Sen. Laurie Monnes Anderson (D-Gresham), a retired public health nurse. Other senators were there, including Sen. Jeff Kruse (R- Roseburg), a ardent opponent of the Oregon Medical Marijuana Act (OMMA), and Sen. Chip Shields (D- Portland), who indicated he supported the measure and would vote to send it on in the process. visit - http://tokesignals.com/medical-marijuana-for-ptsd-compelling-testimony-in-oregon/ "

Tuesday, March 19 at 09:58 AM:
me too wrote:
"FYI, this was in response to my Signon.com petition, which now has 472 signatures. If you have not already signed it, please go to the link below and sign.

Thanks!

Cheryl Smith

-------- Original Message --- -----
Subject: A message to the signers of your petition, Support Senate Bill 281 to add PTSD to the OMMA

Sen. Chip Shields (OR-22), a target of the petition you created on SignOn.org, “Support Senate Bill 281 to add PTSD to the OMMA” (signon.org/sign/support-senate-bill-281), sent the following message to constituents who signed your petition. This message was sent through the SignOn.org system.

--------
Thank you for writing to Senator Shields regarding your support for Senate Bill 281. I apologize for the length of time it has taken me to respond.

Senator Shields has long advocated for veterans the resources they need to succeed once they return home. During the 2007 legislative session, then Representative Shields sponsored HB 2522 which would have required the Department of Veterans Affairs to provide information about depleted uranium and to assist veterans exposed to it. During the 2011 legislative session Senator Shields voted in favor of Senate Joint Memorial 1, urging United States Department of Veterans Affairs to place greater emphasis on transitional housing for homeless veterans. He also voted in favor of House Bill 3391, which established a task force on military families tasked with reviewing legislation to support military families and proposing legislation to bridge the gap between military and civilian life. He was also happy to support funding for the Oregon Department of Veterans Affairs by voting in favor of HB 5546.

On February 28th SB 281 passed out of the Senate Healthcare and Human Services Committee with a do pass recommendation. During the hearing Senator Shields successfully pushed for the bill to passed out of committee with a do pass recommendation. He noted that “I think the proponents of this bill came forward with a very narrow bill related to one particular diagnosis,” Shields said. “I think that if we want to open the can of worms of whether or not medical marijuana is a good thing or a bad thing I think the voters have told us clearly where they are.” The bill has been referred to the Senate Committee on Judiciary. I encourage you to track the progress of the bill by using the Oregon Legislative Information System (OLIS). If we can be of further assistance don’t hesitate to contact our office. Thank you again for your feedback.

Sincerely,

Justin Boro
Office Assistant to Senator
Chip Shields
District 22, N/NE Portland
503-986-1722
900 State Street NE, S-411
Salem, Oregon 97301
PS: If you haven't signed up for our email newsletter, you can do so here: http://www.leg.state.or.us/shieldsc/. You can also follow him on Facebook by friending him here: https://www.facebook.com/chip.shields.5. "

Tuesday, October 25, 2011 at 08:32 AM:
I wrote:
"Action Alert: signatures needed for Veterans medical marijuana petition!!

http://wh.gov/4xd

Please assist Veterans For Medical Cannabis Access. Once we have reached our goal this petition will automatically be sent to the White House for an obligatory answer and we will be using this to kick off a series of actions designed to bring negative attention to the recent federal escalation against medical marijuana. Your help is a significant piece of that puzzle. We need you to sign and get as many others to sign as possible.

As the leader of Veterans For Medical Cannabis Access [VMCA] I helped the VA create a medical marijuana policy that respects the rights of disabled Veterans using this important medicine per state laws. That policy has been made to look like a cruel joke given the latest actions of this presidential administration.

In response to the actions of the president our organization has crafted a petition that we have placed on the new White House "We The People" website: http://wh.gov/4xd

"Allow United States Disabled Military Veterans access to medical marijuana..."

The fact that a Veteran in New Mexico can use cannabis legally for PTSd but a similar Veteran in Florida will not only face arrest by state police for using the same medicine but face punishment at the VA hospital as well is wrong. It is illogical. It is not the practice of medicine it is the practice of politics on the wounded and it is shameful and it must end.

Michael Krawitz is a Disabled United States Air Force Sergeant and Executive Director of Veterans For Medical Cannabis Access.

Veterans For Medical Cannabis Access
3551 Flatwoods Road
Elliston, Virginia 24087
540-365-2141
http://www.veteransformedicalmarijuana.org/ "

Wednesday, September 28, 2011 at 02:15 PM:
me from here wrote:
" Lawmaker Asks PTSD to Qualify for Medical Marijuana Use - http://www.kulr8.com/news/local/Lawmaker-Asks-PTSD-to-Qualify-for-Medical-Marijuana-Use-116440449.html

HELENA - The Senate Judiciary Committee also heard testimony for a bill that calls for revision to the Medical Marijuana Act.

Democrat Senator David Wanzenried is asking the Legislature to authorize post-traumatic stress disorder as a debilitating medical condition qualifying a person for medical marijuana.

"I don’t know how medical marijuana works, I can tell you it does work,” says Senator David Wanzenried (D- Senate District 49.)

“Many of the veterans I’ve worked with, receive medication form the Department of Veteran Affairs that severely impeded their ability to function. I can’t attest to the percentage of veterans I saw from 81’ until 2006 that were using marijuana but I can tell you, in my opinion it was at least 50% probably more and they were able to function in a classroom environment or even a work environment,” says Charlie Brown from Missoula.

Many veterans support Senate Bill 336. By the way, Montana is fourth in the nation for the most veterans per capita. "

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