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Medical Cannabis for PTSD for Veterans, Police, Firefighters and Other American Citizens

Latest Effort to Add PTSD to the OMMP has failed. Read on to see Testimony / Discussion Points as to How The Process was Biased and How Cannabis (Marijuana) is, indeed, safe and effective medicine. See notes on next efforts > here <

Also! Documentary on PTSD Needs Help to Reach Completion. The hour-long program could help hundreds of thousands; they are looking for Americans who care to lend a hand.

Because! Are Veterans Being Given Deadly Cocktails to Treat PTSD?   A potentially deadly drug manufactured by pharmaceutical giant AstraZeneca has been linked to the deaths of soldiers returning from war. Yet the FDA continues to approve it.

Sgt. Eric Layne's death was not pretty.

A few months after starting a drug regimen combining the antidepressant Paxil, the mood stabilizer Klonopin and a controversial anti-psychotic drug manufactured by pharmaceutical giant AstraZeneca, Seroquel, the Iraq war veteran was "suffering from incontinence, severe depression [and] continuous headaches," according to his widow, Janette Layne. Soon he had tremors. " … [H]is breathing was labored [and] he had developed sleep apnea," Layne said.

Janette Layne, who served in the National Guard during Operation Iraqi Freedom along with her husband, told the story of his decline last year, at official FDA hearings on new approvals for Seroquel. On the last day of his life, she testified, Eric stayed in the bathroom nearly all night battling acute urinary retention (an inability to urinate). He died while his family slept. Sgt. Layne had just returned from a seven-week inpatient program at the VA Medical Center in Cincinnati where he was being treated for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). A video shot during that time, played by his wife at the FDA hearings, shows a dangerously sedated figure barely able to talk. Learn more >>>

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Welcome to MERCYs web pages dedicated to information on Action for the Campaign to Add PTSD and related items of interest. 

JOIN the CAMPAIGN! Medical Cannabis for PTSD for Veterans, Police, Firefighters and Other American Citizens The latest effort to add PTSD to the List of Qualifying Conditions to Register with the Oregon Medical Marijuana Program has completely failed. We are sad to report that a new petition to add a series of mental health conditions - including PTSD - to the list of debilitating medical conditions has not been given another chance by appealing to the court and has been offically declared denied. Edward Glick, activist, petitioned the Oregon Medical Marijuana Program to add Clinical Depression, Depressive Symptoms, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), Severe Anxiety, Agitation and Insomnia to Those Diseases and Conditions Which Qualify as ‘Debilitating Medical Conditions’ under the Oregon Medical Marijuana Act.

Written patient testimony was allowed, gathered and submitted - apparently all to no avail. Below is the final report of the expert panel. Of note, 4 members voted to oppose all conditions, including Dr. Higginson, OMMP Director. Some wonder if it was even looked at before rejection. Writes Attorney Lee Berger -

"I wasn't at the ACMM meeting (I had court in Oregon City at 1:30), but write to clarify that DHS has taken no action, as of yet, on Ed's petition. Jana submitted the panel report and Ed's rebuttal on November 24. The protocol, as I understand it, is for Dr. Mel Kohn, the state health officer, to review the report and rebuttal and to make a recommendation to Dr.Bruce Goldberg, the head of DHS for his decision."

The panel report was the anticipated mixed bag.

Stormy, who served as patient advocate, recommended approving all proposed conditions, as did Nurse Teresa Keane. Dr. Cohn recommended approving all except for depressive symptoms. Drs. Fireman and Dodson; the two psychiatrist prohibitionists, rejected adding any condition without comment as did Addictions specialist and prohibitionist Lia. Dr. Higginson, who drafted the administrative rule so there would always be this sort of a split, with his vote being the deciding vote, recommended against adding any conditions, but in true bureaucratic fashion, suggested a legislative concept for further study on PTSD.

Leland R. Berger,
Portland,
OSB #830201,
Attorney for Petitioner Ed Glick

What To Do?

NOTE(s): Last Effort to Add PTSD to the OMMP failed. Read Testimony / Discussion Points as to How The Process was Biased and How Cannabis (Marijuana) is, indeed, safe and effective medicine. Help the Next Efforts underway to add PTSD to the List of Qualifying Conditions to Register with the Oregon Medical Marijuana Program. This coalition is pursuing three (3) options:

1. Administrative rule change: by trying to Petition the OMMP again. See below.

2. Legislative change: we get one or more Legislators to press OMMP/OHA or introduce legislation. See above.

3. Initiative process; in this scenario all other options have panned out and this is the only way to get it done. See below.


PTS(d) Action option

#1. Administrative rule change: by trying to Petition the OMMP again.

--- Strategy and Pros and Cons ---

Pros: The best way.

Cons: unlikely to be succesful. already got shut down.

-Law enforcement discusses proposed changes to the rules with the rules advisory comm. prior to any occurring, and they are likely to be against broadening the number of qualifying conditions.


PTS(d) Action option

#2. Legislative change: we get one or more Legislators to press OMMP/OHA or introduce legislation. Points -

    - by February, if we could greased up and ready to go bill, that law enforcement wouldn't oppose, we could get it passed.

    -we want Veterans groups support, but without them feeling like they’re being used by us.

    -we should have the influential guy from N.M up here, he would get along well w. OR, and help us w/ getting PTSD passed whatever route we take.

    -we have some research coming out that can help us, i.e. NY Times Article about MMJ and PTSD

--- Strategy and Pros and Cons ---

Pros: We have friends in the legislature, we just need to determine sponsors for the bill , etc.

-New Mexico has PTSD as its main qualifying condition for its mmj program, we have Severe pain in OR.

-more than in other wars, the raw numbers and %'s of soldiers returning from the Iraq and Afghanistan wars are suffering from PTSD, and the kind of thing we should do to be patriotic is to honor them and help them.

-somebody trained to kill, that is suffering PTSD, is much less likely to suffer a violent outburst with therapeutic use of MMJ.

-also, the OMMP is interested, bc of the chance to make $$$$, which they are in need of, as represented by the recent registration fee increase.

-new research coming out showing MMJ is effective treatment for PTSD, i.e. Israel study, and MAPS study, recent NY TIMES article.

- PTSD will not just be for veterans, but individual veterans will be an integral part of making it happen - thru Testimony, Lobbying and other Activism, whether or not Vet groups agree, help out, etc.

Cons: there may be a flury of anti-MMJ bills like those filed during the last session to change the OMMP for the worse.


PTS(d) Action option

#3. Initiative process; in this scenario all other options have panned out and this is the only way to get it done. Steps involved:

-draft text, file it, get 10000 signatures, then get ballot title.

-get 86,000 valid signatures by next July

-comment period, review by OR S.Ct. tactic to delay our petition that can be used against us.

· Challenge: whether it meets statutory criteria

--- Strategy and Pros and Cons ---

Pros: - don’t have to go through legislature

- puts pressure on the legislature

- in regards to other initiatives, getting the word out, educational campaign.

Cons: time is of the essence, since nothing has been filed yet, is it realistic to go the petition route and get enough signatures to get on the ballot? Probably not, but may be useful as pressure against legislature

- funding issue, hard to pay people to get enough signatures.

- dilution of efforts bc we have so many different cannabis initiatives across the state in the works right now, is another one going to confuse the population of OR?


What To Do?

At this point the Coalition to Add PTS(d) to the OMMP (CAPO?) is pushing SB281, and organizing summit meetings to further strategize and task out next steps. Go > here < for contact info.

Task: identifying supporters in the legislature: others? · Co-sponsors from each house of congress would be a good idea here. · Key thing is getting people together for statutory change, and identify legislator to file their bill pre-session

Task: Outreach -

    - Veterans support orgainzations.

      · Veterans for Medical Care (VMCA) members,

      all OR vet groups, esp those that already lobby the legislature.

    in the MMJ community

      · MAMA and others

      · NORML chapters

      · ASA and other Nat’l groups like P.O.T. (patients out of time), reach out to Al Burn

NEXT MEETING/Timeline: Next Meeting: TBA. We will have a phone conference again, we liked this set-up.


What For? Is adding the Condition REALLY Necessary?

Yes. Cannabis is a proven therapy for PTS(d), and more, really. The question that should be asked is not about the effacicy of cannabis as medicine - is it the best solution in any case - but rather should we keep arresting, prosecuting and sometimes even killing veterans who chose to use it. For more information about PTS(d) and Cannabis go > here <

· is MMJ effective for treating PTSD?

  Action! What to do for this Alert 

Tell everybody you know Tell everybody you know. Click here for > Flyer with info front and back (2 pages, 8.5x11). Here for > PDF version. <, here for > Quarter sheet front < (or PDF version) and > Quarter sheet back < (or PDF version).

  DHS Officials Contact Info 

TBA

  Act Now! 

Your voice is important!

Oregon DHS decision has denied inclusion of mood symptoms and diseases onto OMMP’s list of qualifying conditions. The Director of the Oregon Dept. of Human Services, Bruce Goldberg MD, and the State Health Officer, Mel Kohn, MD have decided not to include Depression, Depressive symptoms, agitation, insomnia anxietyand PTSD onto the list of qualifying conditions covered under the Oregon Medical Marijuana Act. The “expert” panel convened by the DHS voted 4 to 3 against allowing any of the conditions onto the list. The opposing members were: Chemical Dependency counselor Diane Lia, Dr. Tom Dodson of the Oregon Medical Association, Marian Fireman of the Oregon Psychiatric Association and Dr. Grant Higginson, OMMP Director. The process of evaluation and the panel member selection was marred by significant issues which have virtually guaranteed rejection of conditions, in spite of a hundred patient comments, numerous expert testimonies and a thousand pages of supporting documentation submitted by the petitioner. (Please see Petitioner’s rebuttal for a description of the panel process.)

Without patient feedback it was virtually certain that all conditions would be rejected. This will mean that thousands of Oregonians who use cannabis to combat mood symptoms, diseases or the intolerable effects of pharmaceuticals, will remain in danger of arrest, prosecution, civil asset forfeiture, child protective service investigations, employment discrimination, medical discrimination, jail and forced drug treatment. PLEASE contact us and Join the Campaign today! It is urgent that patients speak up, take part and tell Oregon and the World that you use cannabis to safely and effectively treat your conditions, know someone who does, and that all patients deserve to use any medication that benefits them free of fear of prosecution.

Then, tell everybody you know. And, then, tell everybody you don't know. Yet.


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  Info on Action Alert 

Stand Up, Speak Out! Your voice is important! Sample letter to DHS Officials -

Ed Glick
Corvallis, OR

Dr. Kohn,
State health Officer

Dear Dr. Kohn,

Thank you for your words of openmindedness and consideration of this matter. In my 25 years as a nurse and patient advocate I have nearly always seen cannabis patients lose whenever governmental or medical agencies attempt to evaluate their unique medical or legal issues.

The OMMA was passed by voters, not legislators, because of the unwillingness of legislators to protect vulnerable Oregonians. Oregonians expressed the desire that anyone who suffers from a debilitating condition deserves the protections of lawful use. I believe I demonstrated in my submissions that patients are using cannabis as an effective and relatively safe remedy for the conditions I proposed adding.

With no disrespect to you, the liklihood is that DHS is heading towards a complete rejection of all proposed conditions. Nearly the same justifications in 2000 will be used this time as well in spite of a vast increase in paient experience and clinical research.

Thus, I have little faith that your decision will reflect the needs of patients, rather, I suspect that you are pressured by physician groups, legislators and law enforcement officials who have consistently remained hostile to the needs of cannabis patients. Outright rejection of mental health conditions will cause direct harm to patients and push them further out of a medical system that has been distant and judgemental towards them. I wish my perception was misplaced, and I truely hope to be proven wrong.

Thank you,
ED Glick,
Petitioner

NOTEs, How Its Done: If you have a proposed condition addition, this letter from Lee Berger, Portland-area attorney, to AAG Marc Abrams confirming the rules for the hearings may be of help -

    1)  The process was be as set forth in OAR 333-080-0090;  

    2)  Petitioner will be provided the opportunity to suggest panel members and object to panel members selected by the Department.  The Department will consider his/her suggestions.  Ultimate appointing authority rests with the Department;  

    3)  Petitioner shall have the opportunity to address the panel if he/she so chooses.  

    4)   The panel will hear evidence and Petitioner may suggest a list of patients to testify. He/she may also submit as much written patient testimony as he/she would like.  The panel does not waive its authority to conduct the hearing or its right appropriately to limit the hearing to avoid delay or redundancy;  

    5)  All evidence-gathering meetings of the panel shall be open to the public, except that the panel shall reserve the right to close such portions of the hearing, if any, in which testimony is taken from someone who is concerned about confidentiality; and  

    6)  Evidence will be limited to scientific evidence, and he/she will have an opportunity, once the panel receives all the evidence, to make a final submission to the panel if he would like to rebut any of the evidence.

  PTSD and Cannabis 

What is PTSD? How does cannabis help? Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a psychiatric illness that can occur following a traumatic event in which there was threat of injury or death to you or someone else.

(PTSD) may occur soon after a major trauma, or can be delayed for more than six months after the event. When it occurs soon after the trauma it usually resolves after three months, but some people experience a longer-term form of the condition, which can last for many years. PTSD can occur at any age and can follow a natural disaster such as flood or fire, or events such as war or imprisonment, assault, domestic abuse, or rape. The terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, in the U.S. may have caused PTSD in some people who were involved, in people who witnessed the disaster, and in people who lost relatives and friends. These kinds of events produce stress in anyone, but not everyone develops PTSD.

“One often intractable problem for which cannabis provides relief is post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). I have more than 100 patients with PTSD. Among those reporting that cannabis alleviates their PTSD symptoms are veterans of the war in Vietnam, the first Gulf War, and the current occupation of Iraq. Similar benefit is reported by victims of family violence, rape and other traumatic events, and children raised in dysfunctional families.” -- David Bearman, MD; from PTSD and Cannabis: A Clinician Ponders Mechanism of Action.

For more information, Visit our page of info on PTSD and Cannabis, and tell everybody you know about it. And get them to write and spread the word, etc.

  Library of Documentation for this Alert  

Title / Description

Text version

Adobe-PDF version

original version (MS-WORD, MS-Works, PPT)

EDWARD GLICK’S PETITION PURSUANT TO ORS §475.334 | In the Matter of the Petition of Edward Glick, to add Clinical Depression, Depressive Symptoms, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), Severe Anxiety, Agitation and Insomnia, to Those Diseases and Conditions Which Qualify as ‘Debilitating Medical Conditions’ under the Oregon Medical Marijuana Act

here

here

here for DOC and here for WPS

Panel Meeting Report, July 27, 2009. | The consideration of the evidence and the structure of what constituted evidence was drawn so narrowly at this meeting that nothing could be considered except the narrowly focused and small evidence that was provided to panel members in folders marked “risk” and “benefit”. The evidence grading criteria determined by Dr. Austin include only research conducted on humans. Since there has been a systematic policy by the U.S. Government for 50 years to disallow research into cannabis, the existing research is miniscule in comparison to the patient experience. Therefore, the panel members are forced to conclude that evidence is weak or insufficient to justify inclusion of any condition.

here

here

here

Panel Report, cover letter 2. |

here

here

here

Panel Report, cover letter (1). |

here

here

here

Action Notice. | -URGENT NOTICE – Your voice is important! Oregon DHS decision pending on inclusion of mood symptoms and diseases onto OMMP’s list of qualifying conditions. The Director of the Oregon Dept. of Human Services, Bruce Goldberg MD, and the State Health Officer, Mel Kohn, MD will be deciding in November about whether or not to include Depression, Depressive symptoms, agitation, insomnia anxietyand PTSD onto the list of qualifying conditions covered under the Oregon Medical Marijuana Act. The “expert” panel convened by the DHS voted 4 to 3 against allowing any of the conditions onto the list. The opposing members were: Chemical Dependency counselor Diane Lia, Dr. Tom Dodson of the Oregon Medical Association, Marian Fireman of the Oregon Psychiatric Association and Dr. Grant Higginson of DHS. The process of evaluation and the panel member selection was marred by significant issues which have virtually guaranteed rejection of conditions, in spite of a hundred patient comments, numerous expert testimonies and a thousand pages of supporting documentation submitted by the petitioner. (Please see Petitioner’s rebuttal for a description of the panel process.)

here

here

here

Panel Report. |

here

here

here

New Research. | Petitioner Edward Glick, petitions the Oregon Medical Marijuana Program to add Clinical Depression, Depressive Symptoms, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), Severe Anxiety, Agitation and Insomnia to Those Diseases and Conditions Which Qualify as ‘Debilitating Medical Conditions’ under the Oregon Medical Marijuana Act, as follows: This petition is subject to OAR 333-008-0090, and for that reason, petitioner submits the following new scientific research in support of adding each of these conditions. This additional research submission is in addition to research submitted in January, 2009.

here

here

here

Anxiety Depression Petition Final. | Petition to Include Anxiety and Depression On Amendment 20 To: Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment. Submitted By: Dr. David J Muller, PhD Psychiatrist Larissa Lawrence, Colorado Compassion Club Matthew Schnur, University of Northern Colorado, School of Cell & Molecular Biology, Employee of Cannabis Therapeutics | I. Introduction In recent years the medical community has identified new molecular mechanisms of anxiety and depression, as well as the neuroanatomical structures associated with these phenomena. In addition, since the discovery of the cannabinoid receptor over 15 years ago, both human studies and animal models have found cannabinoids to be effective in the treatment of anxiety and depression.

here

here

here

Detailed Explanation, final. | Detailed Explanation Justifying the Inclusion of Additional Conditions Detailed Explanation Justifying Inclusion of “Psychiatric” Conditions onto the List of “Qualifying Conditions” in the Oregon Medical Marijuana Program A Petition to the Oregon Department of Human Services was submitted through the Advisory Committee on Medical Marijuana on January 26, 2009. The objective of this Petition is to request the Oregon DHS to conduct an expert advisory panel. This process which is described in ORS 475.334 previously met in 2000. The end result of that deliberation was the inclusion of “Agitation Related to Alzheimers Disease” to the list of qualifying conditions of the Oregon Medical Marijuana Act. On February 9, 2009, DHS accepted the recent petition and requested “a detailed explanation for why these conditions should be included…” This document attempts to supply that explanation.

here

here

here

Diabetes & The Endocannabinoid System: Prospects For Therapeutic Control By: Matthew Schnur | Quick Outline This will be a very detailed discussion, so lets put it in perspective First we’ll discuss causes of diabetes Then move on to insulin receptor signaling and defects in this mechanism Next we will focus on the PPARã and cannabinoid CB1 & CB2 receptors Finally, it will all be tied together; how cannabinoid therapy treats the symptoms of Type 1 & Type 2 Diabetes. Diabetes Background Over 28 million Americans have diabetes (Type 1 or 2) 80% of cases are diagnosed as Type 2 The leading cause of blindness and amputations Diagnosed cases are rising exponentially-directly related to diet For every kg bodyweight over healthy BMI, a 7% increase in getting Type 2 is found

here

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Diabetes is debilitating. | Petition to Add Types 1 and 2 Diabetes Mellitus to List of Debilitating Medical Conditions Pursuant to Colorado Constitution, Article XVIII § 14 and 6 CCR 1006-2 ... I. Introduction: In the following discussion we intend to prove that diabetes mellitus is a clearly diagnosable disease with specific, easily utilized tests that demonstrate exact parameters for categorization into one of two subtypes. These diagnostic criteria have been developed by the world’s leading experts in diabetes research; the World Health Organization (WHO) and American Diabetes Association (ADA). Second, we shall identify symptoms and complications resulting from the chronic progression of this disease. In this section we will also address the evidence demonstrating Types 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus as chronic.

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Petition part one. |

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Wednesday, June 22, 2011 at 10:24 PM:
Todd Dalotto from Cannabis Research Committee wrote:
"We have a brief window of opportunity to add PTSD as a qualifying debilitating condition administratively that closes July 26 when Barry Kast's temporary post ends. It's a slim chance, and Barry may be shining us on about it. However, if we work quickly and effectively, we will either succeed at adding PTSD and averting a disastrous fee re- structuring, or at least our evidence and effort will be go down favorably on public record.

If we can assemble a team dedicated to presenting this evidence, then I am willing to continue pursuing this proposal through every channel available to me. If not, I will re- focus my energies on other important work. I'm thinking if we can generate a convincing body of evidence, we can call a special ACMM meeting in mid July for the purpose of presenting this evidence to Barry Kast to consider for adding PTSD as a qualifying condition administratively before leaving his post.

The four areas of evidence we must present are:

- Estimated increase in the number of OMMP cardholders as a result of adding PTSD as a qualifying condition

- Projected increase in revenue resulting from adding PTSD along with recommended fee structure changes if necessary

- Peer reviewed medical evidence for the safety & efficacy of cannabis used in the treatment for PTSD

- Testimony from PTSD patients who benefit from the use of cannabis

Please let me know asap if you are willing and able to form this team to get this important work done in a short time.

Very important & timely!! Does anyone have reliable data showing the > potential increase in OMMP cardholder rates if PTSD or other conditions are > added as qualifying conditions? > > We are investigating other ways for the OMMP to meet the SB 5529 spending > budget without causing 25,000 patients to drop from the program due to > prohibitive fee increases.

Todd Dalotto
Cannabis Horticultural Researcher
Director, Cannabis Research Committee
P.O. Box 1221,
Philomath, OR, 97370
541-829-0961
toddCRC@gmail.com
www.omcra.net "

Sunday, June 19 at 09:51 PM:
i2 from here2 wrote:
"data on combat vets in oregon will give a starting point. add to that all abused children. then take the percentage of carded patients verses patients with those conditions, giving you the average of qualifying conditions that are carded. that number times the vets and abused children will get you close. "

Thursday, June 9, 2011 at 09:50 AM:
Ed Glick from Healing-Flower Center wrote:
" I can happily send you a CD with the entire research base as well as all the legal documents. Thanks, ED "

on 3/20/2011 at 3:13 PM:
WB from OR wrote:
"I have major PTSD and a mild traumatic brain injuries from Explosions in Iraq. I never smoked marijuana . When I came home I had episodes of major depression to where I couldn't hold a relationship and was losing friends. I friend asked me to smoke while I was in a bad way. I calmed ME and a went to sleep a short time later. The ones saying no to PTSD are not suffering from it and it does suppress the symptoms."

on 12/18/2010 at 11:50 AM:
1st hand knowledge from OR wrote:
"Dr. Kohn, State Health Officer Dear Dr. Kohn,

I understand that you are an extremely busy individual so I’ll attempt to be brief. A person in your position has probably seen all the research done on medical marijuana; I will instead tell about how medical marijuana has affected me, a soldier diagnosed with PTSD. I served in OIF V-VII; it was an extremely daunting task that resulted in a classic case of PTSD; I am 50% disabled. Thankfully Battle fatigue is progressively receiving the recognition it deserves, this recognition directly results in an olio of treatments.

When I first returned from war my superiors would slap me on the back and sternly say “Soldier on!” As problems exacerbated and were finally recognized I was sent to counselors. Here a soldier who had some type of certificate ran a group counseling session; I found that the group sessions were of little help. The issue really took a terrible turn when I fulfilled my contract with the Army; I decided to try the civilian life. I attempted to build a life I would be proud of. Through sabotage PTSD stripped me of my life. The chronic pains of war took quite a savage toll, all I could do was drag what I had left to the VA; the intervention they immediately gave was medication. I lived the next 2 years in a prescription coma. As a perspective anchor in this condition even leaving my home was distressing; entirely fed up I spent every penny I had to explore an abundant amount of alternatives; acupuncture, chiropractor, massage therapy, and even hypnosis all to no avail. Finally medical marijuana was suggested.

Curious as to how medical marijuana would solve my problem, I conducted research on an imposing scale. I was initially overwhelmed at the amount of available data and intrigued I sought the advice of professionals. After a visit with two doctors, medical marijuana was prescribed. This was the turnaround marker in my life. Through 5 years of treatment nothing has combated my PTSD like medical marijuana. It is entirely probable that had this treatment been available sooner, my suffering would have been dramatically reduced; optimistically perhaps 5 years of hardship could have been avoided. Unfortunately optimism is no longer common practice. I find it terrifying that the most effective treatment I have found is being harbored from Oregonian soldiers suffering from PTSD.

I recently moved to this lovely state for schooling purposes. I am a full time student that maintains a 3.82 GPA. Now that I’m in Oregon I’m no longer able to have a medical marijuana card for my PTSD. I feel as if I’m being forced back into my pharmaceutical coma. I do understand that priorities are life. However, I ask that you help me continue my rebounding life; I fully appreciate that you are tasked with, and able to maintain an unbiased informed decision.

Thank you for your time,

Specialist Williams,
United States Army."

Monday, July 19, 2010 at 07:45 AM:
somebody wrote:
"A letter from the VA about medical marijuana important to all vets - http://mercycenters.org/libry/VA-Undersecretary-Jun6.pdf - The letter makes clear that the VA accepts the use of medical marijuana in states where there are medical marijuana laws. "

Tuesday, May 4 at 08:17 AM:
infantry medic from salem, oregon wrote:
"when i got back from iraq i couldnt sleep eat or leave my house sober. it felt like i was on mission all day everyday. i remember seeing men in black mandress run across the road as a fairly common hallucination driving to work, a couple months later later after 6 weeks in an institution and lots of meds like seroquel and thorazine and valium i was able to "function" im off the major antipsychotics which are more just sedatives with nasty side effects i know use marijuana and a couple of meds. "

Thursday, March 25, 2010 at 07:14 PM:
Brian M. Carroll from Portland, Oregon wrote:
" Marijuana makes my reoccurring nightmares stop all together when used daily before sleep time, helps me actually get restful sleep, and helps day to day with dampening my hyper vigilance not to mention keeping my anxiety in check. =D Wish I could use it legally for my PTSD. "

Sunday, November 15, 2009 at 2:08 pm:
a Veteran wrote:
" SUBJECT: PTSD and medical cannabis
This testimony is a response to viewing your site. I am an Army Veteran who served two years in combat in the Iraq/OIF war after returning from my 2nd year in combat I had severe symtoms of PTSD a year and 4 months was the length of time it took to get diagnosed by the VA and to become 100% service conected. Along with nightmares, also comes deppresion, and sever anxiety. The VA thinks there making a differance with there medications, but for they do very little if anything. I do think there is medical benefits for medical canibus in PTSD patients. but I have know idea how to persue this, or if it well ever be possible. I live in Washington state but feel any state that approves adding PTSD to the list of patients were medical canibus is legal for those condition is moving in the right direction.

sincerly,

Nate B.


Wednesday, September 30, 2009 at 11:21 AM:
Oregon Nurse wrote:
" SUBJECT: MERCY PTSD Campaign Pg feedBack
------------------
feedback: I am also a nurse in oregon. I would like for these disorders to come to pass inorder to reach greater numbers of patients (and healthcare workers) who already medicate for these disorders and take potentially harmful medications.

Antidepressants increase risks for suicidal ideation?! Opiods cause consitpation, rebound headaches and severe withdrawl; Ativan can produce seizure activity and withhdrawl as well.

The pharmeceutical industry is rittled with issues of abuse, misuse. Everyday at work, I see the public feeling powerless in their right to choose their medicine of choice, and resist pharmeceutical options. I work with the elderly. Not psychedelic ward patients. With the exception of pediatrics, I see a huge consensus within medical communities.

But what to do if a nurse is a card holder? Do they get fired for having a card? Do they get fired for having a blatantly positive for marijuana drug test? Lying IS bad and it doesn't need to be done, nurses are associated with integrity. Nurses are also associateed with chronic pain issues. Weigh in folks!

I think what our society needs to see is some discretion from the marijuana community in order to endorse fully decriminalized access. For those already within the medical field our quandry continues. Please open doors for debate. Nurseing is so physically demanding, and after dealing with years of intense greif and frustrations from dealing with sick populations it is important that healthcare workers have effective ways to recover in their spare time. No one wants thir nurse to be high on cocaine, but I know many patients who are ok with their nurse being a "stoner".

It goes without saying do to what is verbalized in the Nurse Acts nationwide that intoxication at work is unacceptable. Just because alcohol is legal doesn't mean it is ok to start IV's and take Vital signs 'buzzing'. Self medication is rampant and demonized, and it is stigmatized within the nursing and medial doctor community. The Patient-Nurse relationship is a two way street more then any policy writter can wrap their heads around. I can not offer a soluable solutiont to this timeframes with drug tests capture and the correlation between intoxxication at work. But showing up to work after smoking weed, and/or part taking AT work are not ethical in my opinion.

If more nurses were allwed to smoke weed under the current guidelines of the medical marijuana act (or some revision of it), we wouln't have a nursing shortage folks!

Cheers to all the nurses and doctors who smoke weed, exercise daily, eat fresh healthy food, take care of 30 patients in a day without causing any harm, we are healers by trade, and we sacrifice our physical condition to produce health in others!

I would like to see the same laws that protect our patients protect healthcare workers!

Oregon Nurse "


Tuesday, August 18, 2009 at 11:21 AM:
Teresa from somewhere in America wrote:
" Hi. I am not sure who I am writing to but I would just like to add testimony to the debate or whatever you would call it about using Medical Marijuana as help dealing with PTSD. I am an OMMP patient and have been diagnosed with PTSD. I received my card because of chronic pain from 2 back surgeries and severe Fibromyalgia. Marijuana is so helpful just to relax your body and mind when you have Post Traumatic Stress. It helps me tremendously when I have high anxiety and pain. As long as you take or inhale small amounts you can still function and do whatever it is you need to do throughout the day. Although I mostly use it in the evening to relieve the stress and pain of the day. I am so glad PTSD is being considered for the list for use by OMMP patients. I know that it would help alot of people. Thanks for listening, Teresa K. "

Tuesday, July 7, 2009 at 03:38 PM:
Doug from Beatty, OR wrote:
" Disabled Vet ... PSTD from '69. Pain comes so many ways... Hope it goes thru. Peace. "

Tuesday, May 19 at 12:57 AM:
Lee Abraham from St. Helens, Oregon wrote:
" I suffer from severe stress, anxiety, insomnia, and pain in my hands,and knees and marijuana helps very much with my pain and sleeping problems "

Thursday, April 23, 2009 at 12:43 AM:
DdC from SCruz, Cannafornia told us about these links:

Pot Shots for Israeli Soldiers
"The Israel Defence Forces (IDF) medical corps, in cooperation with the Hebrew University in Jerusalem, is introducing the use of THC, the active agent in the cannabis plant, which helps relieve post-traumatic stress disorders, on an experimental basis, an army statement said. visit - http://cannabisnews.com/news/thread19285.shtml

Cannabis Nurse’ "Gives Up" License & State Co - DdC Sat Nov 25, 2006, visit - http://drugwarrant.net/forum/viewtopic.php?t=604

Dr. Molly Fry gets 5 ******* Years! MM, visit - http://tinyurl.com/3mbxyf

Groups Endorsing RxGanja, visit - http://drugwarrant.net/forum/viewtopic.php?t=1195

High Times for Alzheimers
"My basic hypothesis," he says, "is that Aß is taken up into neurons, where it is phophorylated [garlanded, like tau, with phosphorus and oxygen"> and kills them. It's this toxic action that cannabinoids prevent." Milton discovered this by incubating human neurons in culture, and then poisoning them with Aß. When he added cannabinoids to the brew, Aß was apparently no longer toxic." ~ Dr Nathaniel Milton, a biochemist at London's Royal Free and University College medical school. visit - http://cannabisnews.com/news/thread14254.shtml

Sister Somaya Kambui 03/20/02, visit - http://endingcannabisprohibition.yuku.com/topic/714

Granny Storm Crow's MMJ List, visit - http://www.icmag.com/ic/showthread.php?t=95659

Rx Ganja, visit - http://i35.tinypic.com/263j4et.jpg

Ganjawar's Spontaneous Abortionists, visit - http://tinyurl.com/pesticideabortionists

Nixon Lie Keeps on Killing, visit - http://endingcannabisprohibition.yuku.com/topic/1523/master/1/

Ganja 4 PTSD & Depression
“Why would we evolve a chemical that would make us forget, that would affect our short-term memory?” That seems maladaptive. His answer was one of the great “a-ha!” moments I had when I was working on this book. He said, “Well, do you really want to remember all the faces you saw in the subway this morning, all the faces in the supermarket?” And I realized at that moment, well, of course, forgetting is not a defect of a mental operation, although it can certainly be that; forgetting is a mental operation. It’s almost as important as remembering. " ~ Michael Pollan Cannabis, the Importance of Forgetting. visit - http://drugwarrant.net/forum/viewtopic.php?t=1285

Iraq & Afghan Vets Suffer PTSD & Depression, visit - http://tinyurl.com/47jlc9

Many Veterans are the Enemy of the D.E.A.th War, visit - http://drugwarrant.net/forum/viewtopic.php?t=62

Patients Don't Need Politicians or COPs...Buzz Off - DdC 11/14/02
"Jake was an old time lawyer, took poultry and vegetables as pay sometimes in the old days...", visit - http://endingcannabisprohibition.yuku.com/topic/1150

STOP the Disease Tax!

Senior Home Care - DdC
"Cannabis Caregivers Ganjameds FARMaceuticals & Extractums. I've been doing hospice work, mostly live in care almost 20 years in Santa Cruz. Found out in the early 90's how Ganja whisked away dementia like a broom to cobwebs. I usually just make a batch of Ganja milk, 1g to 100ml milk, tad butter simmer don't boil 10/15 min/turns lite greenish. One or two teaspoons before bed and the chemically induced bloody nightmares dissipated. Found it also preserves the milk. ." visit - http://endingcannabisprohibition.yuku.com/topic/1167

Virtues' of Ganja, visit - http://tinyurl.com/4deh6e

Politics of Pot, visit - http://tinyurl.com/4epw2n

"Hello future medical marijuana patient, I’ve always believed in the medicinal effects of marijuana.” - Sona Patel M.D., visit - http://www.doc420.com "

Friday, April 17, 2009 at 5:41 AM:
Joel from somewhere in America wrote:
" To whom it may concern,

This is to encourage adding PTSD to the list of MMJ treatable conditions. It only stands to reason that if a medication helps with a medical condition then it should be prescribed. Instead of just giving my opinion maybe it will help for me to share my story.

I have been dealing with my issues for about 20 years now but was only diagnosed by the VA in the last year with PTSD, anxiety disorder and I am bi-polar. I medicated myself with MJ for a long time but quit about 5 years ago due to a change of employment.

Two years ago I started using mental health services available through the community and the VA because my issues were getting too much for me to deal with myself. After trying no less than 10 different pharmaceuticals including Prozac, Valium, Risparadol and Paxil (all with no benefit) I was lucky enough to be prescribed the last two Medications at the same time which resulted in a drug interaction that put me in a coma for two weeks and on life support for four days, not to mention the six months of hallucinations the medication caused prior to my hospitalization . After my hospital stay I stopped taking all pysch meds and started smoking again. The nightmares have stopped, I get more than one hour of sleep a night (meds caused insomnia) and all original symptoms have lessened to manageable levels again and all side effects of the psych meds have gone.

I can not speak for anyone else, but for me, my ONLY option is MMJ. Due to the present laws in this state I have been forced to seek medication that works outside of legal means and risk all the penalties of breaking the law. Due to physical issues I also have (Degenerative disc disease, Bursitis and Osteoarthritis) I am now able to secure MMJ. While my medication issues are solved I have recently learned that I am not alone in dealing with exactly the same mental health issues and the same medication issues.

If there is anything I can do to aid you in making this a reality please do not hesitate to contact me. "

Friday, March 27, 2009 at 10:10 AM:
Greg Troutt from Salem, OR wrote:
"Medical cannabis has helped reduce the symptoms of PTSD, depression, anxiety, insomnia and pain without relying on big pharmaceutical companies. I have saved so much money on not having to buy these prescriptions that it's one of the reasons I'm still alive. People live and work to pay for medication, but what happens when they can't afford it anymore? As for the state growing my medicine... would it then also grow it's own tobacco and brew it's own alcohol? Would they make Oxycotin, Valium, Percocet, etc? Not no, but HELL NO! So why do they want to get into producing medicine for only one type of patient? Discrimination? I beleive the government should let the current growers continue to make medicine, after all, don't we do it better?"

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